me
Heavens, 'tis dusk already!

Betty Ann on Flipboard

Noteworthy and Not





How Is This 8-Bit Blade Runner Game Not Actually Real?
Eric Limer on Paleofuture, shared by Brian Barrett to Gizmodo, gizmodo.com
If you love Blade Runner (and how could you not), you’ve just got to have a soft-spot for old-school games (and how could you not). This little masterpiece proves that they’re two great tastes that taste great together.Read more…

How Is This 8-Bit Blade Runner Game Not Actually Real?
Eric Limer on Paleofuture, shared by Brian Barrett to Gizmodo, gizmodo.com

If you love Blade Runner (and how could you not), you’ve just got to have a soft-spot for old-school games (and how could you not). This little masterpiece proves that they’re two great tastes that taste great together.Read more…



 Woodblock prints of Hiroshi Yoshida via akihmbo

In 1899, Yoshida had his first American exhibition at Detroit Museum of Art (now Detroit Institute of Art).

04/13/14967 notes • Reblogged from brucesterling


ryanpanos:

Grand Facade | Marlon de Azambuja | Via

Sometimes, all you need to create some magic is some magic markers. In a new series called Gran Fachada (“Grand Facade” in English), Madrid-based architect and designer Marlon de Azambuja works this marker magic on color photographs of famous museums around the world, from the Whitney to the Pompidou and the Tate Modern. Using a marker to black out sections of these images, he reveals fluorescent color-negative line drawings, which would probably look amazing as velvet black-light posters. Thin outlines of color expose where the contours of an architectural rendering would be, the intricacy of which approaches that of the buildings’ original blueprints.

04/13/141,277 notes • Reblogged from notational


There is no speech or performance addressed to a public that does not try to specify in advance, in countless highly condensed ways, the lifeworld of its circulation: not just through its discursive claims — of the kind that can be said to be oriented to understanding — but through the pragmatics of its speech genres, idioms, stylistic markers, address, temporality, mise-en-scène, citational field, interlocutory protocols, lexicon, and so on. Its circulatory fate is the realization of that world. Public discourse says not only “Let a public exist” but “Let it have this character, speak this way, see the world in this way.” It then goes in search of confirmation that such a public exists, with greater or lesser success—success being further attempts to cite, circulate, and realize the world understanding it articulates. Run it up the flagpole and see who salutes. Put on a show and see who shows up.
Michael Warner, “Publics and Counterpublics,” Publics and Counterpublics, p. 114 (via autolykoi)
04/13/1419 notes • Reblogged from notational







pewresearch:

04/11/1470 notes • Reblogged from notational


theantidote:

Japanese Porridge & Pickles with Sencha
high-res photo

theantidote:

Japanese Porridge & Pickles with Sencha

04/10/14316 notes • Reblogged from theantidote


Oh, the comfort - the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person - having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but pouring them all right out, just as they are, chaff and grain together; certain that a faithful hand will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then with the breath of kindness blow the rest away.
Dinah Craik, A Life for a Life (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)
04/10/1463 notes • Reblogged from catherinewillis


theantidote:

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell

The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 

(via worclip:)

04/10/14540 notes • Reblogged from catherinewillis



galenseniorsem:

First really user friendly 3d printer? Definitely more accessible on the cost.

04/10/145 notes • Reblogged from notational