me
Heavens, 'tis dusk already!

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Noteworthy and Not




Short and mind blowing.



The knell of the bells at the Gion temple
Echoes the impermanence of all things.
The colour of the flowers on its double-trunked tree
Reveals the truth that to flourish is to fall.
He who is proud is not so for long,
Like a passing dream on a night in spring.
He who is brave is finally destroyed,
To be no more than dust before the wind.
10/20/141 note • Reblogged from parochialaesthetics




torfalcon:

Avenue, Gascony, October 2014  pastel on paper 30x30cms
TOR FALCON high-res photo

torfalcon:

Avenue, Gascony, October 2014  pastel on paper 30x30cms

TOR FALCON

10/20/14111 notes • Reblogged from torfalcon


Shade, Simon Heijdens, London 2014 from Studio Simon Heijdens on Vimeo.

notational:

Who? What? When? Where?

Curious.

(Source: rubiaceae)

10/19/149 notes • Reblogged from notational


littlelimpstiff14u2:

by Roxanne Goldberg Posted on October 17, 2014

With a focus on light and perspective, Olafur Eliasson’s installations have a transformative capacity that allows the viewer to experience the illusion of a supernatural environment. In an interstitial space of the Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul, Gravity Stairs is composed of glowing spheres which, attached to the ceiling and bathed in warm yellow light, resemble the sun. The otherworldly light and a mirror on the ceiling present an impression of floating through space and among celestial bodies.

Mirrors are essential to the magic of Eliasson’s work, which often challenges an individual’s usual relation to space and acts as a humble reminder of one’s minuscule place within the vast universe. While Gravity Stairs certainly achieves this effect through large-scale installation, the same impact is present in Eliasson’s smaller-scaled works, such as the recent Your Fading Other. Installed in the corner of a white-walled room, partially silvered glass is raised on a cold concrete block, creating the illusion of a room beyond. A desk is in the unreachable distance and fades into the background, imbuing one with a sense of loss and unreachable dreams.

The piece follows a 2012 sculpture, Your Arctic View, exhibited in 2013 at a solo show at neugerriemschneider in Berlin. Shown alongside thee other mirror works, Your Arctic View engages the viewer in a dance with one’s reflection, veiled under what appears to be a thick cloud of fog. Just as Gravity Stairs challenges one to imagine the feeling of falling toward the sun, Your Arctic View engages the viewer in the big-picture question of what it would be like to disappear. The effects can be utterly emancipating or perfectly catastrophic.

Hi-Fructose
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10/19/14162 notes • Reblogged from notational


toolsfortoday:

Last year Khaled Jarrar, a rising Palestinian artist, began printing his own “State of Palestine” stamps, since law forbids the Palestinian postal service from issuing stamps with the politically-charged phrase. Jarrar issued the postage stamps to foreigners arriving in the occupied territories in Israel.

toolsfortoday:

Last year Khaled Jarrar, a rising Palestinian artist, began printing his own “State of Palestine” stamps, since law forbids the Palestinian postal service from issuing stamps with the politically-charged phrase. Jarrar issued the postage stamps to foreigners arriving in the occupied territories in Israel.

10/17/1419 notes • Reblogged from jacobwren


sirfbollywood:

Bol Beliya - Song - Kill Dil #BolBeliya

10/17/144 notes • Reblogged from sirfbollywood


I Went to the Fatherland of All Modern Apples

There is a theory that the “centers of origin” of a species can be found in the places where you find the highest diversity of that species. That idea was developed by Nikolai Vavilov, a remarkable Soviet-era botanist who dedicated his life to finding the biological origins of major food plants in an effort to combat hunger. (It is not without irony that he died of starvation in a gulag). Vavilov studied the origin of the apple, and concluded that the domestic apple (Malus domestica) had evolved from a species of wild apple (Malus siversii), endemic to Southern Kazakhstan. That all domestic apples originate from the mountains in southern Kazakhstan has since been confirmed by modern genetics. While there, I followed in his footsteps, leaving Almaty for the Tien Shan Mountain range, to find wild apple forests.


Seriously, this is a tasty read. - Betty Ann high-res photo

I Went to the Fatherland of All Modern Apples

There is a theory that the “centers of origin” of a species can be found in the places where you find the highest diversity of that species. That idea was developed by Nikolai Vavilov, a remarkable Soviet-era botanist who dedicated his life to finding the biological origins of major food plants in an effort to combat hunger. (It is not without irony that he died of starvation in a gulag). Vavilov studied the origin of the apple, and concluded that the domestic apple (Malus domestica) had evolved from a species of wild apple (Malus siversii), endemic to Southern Kazakhstan. That all domestic apples originate from the mountains in southern Kazakhstan has since been confirmed by modern genetics. While there, I followed in his footsteps, leaving Almaty for the Tien Shan Mountain range, to find wild apple forests. Seriously, this is a tasty read. - Betty Ann

(Source: tumblr.com)





Study Tip
How to Study by MIT Graduate

Scott Young recently finished an astounding feat: he completed all 33 courses in MIT’s fabled computer science curriculum, from Linear Algebra to Theory of Computation, in less than one year. More importantly, he did it all on his own, watching the lectures online and evaluating himself using the actual exams. Check out the link for more in depth info.

1. Coverage

The first step in learning anything deeply, is to get a general sense of what you need to learn.For a class, this means watching lectures or reading textbooks. For self-learning it might mean reading several books on the topic and doing research.
Take sparse notes while reading, or do a one-paragraph summary after you read each major section.

2. Practice
Practice problems should be used to highlight areas you need to develop a better intuition for.
Non-technical subjects, ones where you mostly need to understand concepts, not solve problems, can often get away with minimal practice problem work. In these subjects, you’re better off spending more time on the third phase, developing insight.

3. Insight

THE FEYNMAN TECHNIQUE
The technique is simple:

a)Get a piece of paper
b) Write at the top the idea or process you want to understand
c)Explain the idea, as if you were teaching it to someone else

What’s crucial is that the third step will likely repeat some areas of the idea you already understand. However, eventually you’ll reach a stopping point where you can’t explain. That’s the precise gap in your understanding that you need to fill.

For Formulas

Formulas should be understood, not just memorized. So when you see a formula, but can’t understand how it works, try walking through each part with a Feynman.

Most intuitions about an idea break down into one of the following types:

a)Analogies – You understand an idea by correctly recognizing an important similarity between it and an easier-to-understand idea.

b)Visualizations – Abstract ideas often become useful intuitions when we can form a mental picture of them. Even if the picture is just an incomplete representation of a larger, and more varied, idea.

c) Simplifications – A famous scientist once said that if you couldn’t explain something to your grandmother, you don’t fully understand it. Simplification is the art of strengthening those connections between basic components and complex ideas.

10/15/142,138 notes • Reblogged from notational


The central point of Chun’s argument is that computers (and media in general) rely upon a notion of programmability that has become part of the underlying societal logic of neoliberal capitalism. In a society where computers are tied ever more closely to power, Chun argues that canny manipulation of software restores a sense of control or sovereignty to individual users, even as their very reliance upon this software constitutes a type of disempowerment. Computers are the driving force and grounding metaphor behind an ideology that seeks to determine the future—a future that “can be bought and sold” and which “depends on programmable visions that extrapolate the future—or more precisely, a future—based on the past”
10/15/148 notes • Reblogged from notational