me
Heavens, 'tis dusk already!

Betty Ann on Flipboard

Noteworthy and Not



mocada-museum:

Portland State, “Black Studies Center public dialogue. Pt. 2,” May 30, 1975.Listen to the full audio of the panel.
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mocada-museum:

Portland State, “Black Studies Center public dialogue. Pt. 2,” May 30, 1975.

Listen to the full audio of the panel.

07/17/142,456 notes • Reblogged from purpleishboots


07/07/145,314 notes • Reblogged from catherinewillis


glitchinc:

Land of confusion, 2014.

glitchinc:

Land of confusion, 2014.

07/04/14316 notes • Reblogged from notational


transistoradio:

Larry Sultan (1946-2009), Portrait of My Father with Newspaper (1988), chromogenic print, 87.9 x 72.7 cm. Collection of Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, USA. Via Smithsonian.
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transistoradio:

Larry Sultan (1946-2009), Portrait of My Father with Newspaper (1988), chromogenic print, 87.9 x 72.7 cm. Collection of Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, USA. Via Smithsonian.

07/04/1434 notes • Reblogged from notational


argonauticos:

 Steve Lambert
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argonauticos:

 Steve Lambert

(Source: nickyottav)

07/04/1479 notes • Reblogged from notational


So, what if, instead of thinking about solving your whole life, you just think about adding additional good things. One at a time. Just let your pile of good things grow.
Attachments, Rainbow Rowell   (via stellablu)

(Source: anditslove)

07/04/1426,982 notes • Reblogged from catherinewillis


I felt once more how simple and frugal a thing is happiness: a glass of wine, a roast chestnut, a wretched little brazier, the sound of the sea. Nothing else.
Nikos Kazantzakis, Zorba the Greek (via observando)
07/04/14519 notes • Reblogged from catherinewillis


All media exist to invest our lives with artificial perceptions and arbitrary values
Marshall McLuhan (via iamakinn)
07/02/1484 notes • Reblogged from notational


mymodernmet:

Who knew Legos could be so practical? The tiny figures’ hands are the perfect size to hold cords and cables. By combining the toys with Sugru, a moldable synthetic rubber, you can attach the Lego figures to any surface to make a handy little organizer for your various chargers and devices.

07/02/14416 notes • Reblogged from mymodernmet


(Source: kittykoti)

07/02/145,109 notes • Reblogged from notational



notational:

patternsofbehavior:

There has been quite a bit of chatter this past week after it was revealed that a recent Facebook outage was the result of a psychological experiment that the company conducted on a portion of its users without their permission. The experiment, which was described in a paper published by Facebook, and UCSF, tested the contagion of emotions on social media by manipulating the content of personal feeds and measuring how this impacted user behavior.

Over 600,000 users were used as guinea pigs without their consent, which raises a number of serious ethical and legal questions (particularly due to the fact that this study received federal funding), however there is an even more disturbing angle to this story. It turns out that this research was connected to a Department of Defense project called the Minerva Initiative, which funds universities to model the dynamics, risks and tipping points for large-scale civil unrest across the world.

In the official credits for the study conducted by Facebook you’ll find Jeffrey T. Hancock from Cornell University. If you go to the Minerva initiative website you’ll find that Jeffery Hancock received funding from the Department of Defense for a study called "Cornell: Modeling Discourse and Social Dynamics in Authoritarian Regimes". If you go to the project site for that study you’ll find a visualization program that models the spread of beliefs and disease.

Cornell University is currently being funded for another DoD study right now called "Cornell: Tracking Critical-Mass Outbreaks in Social Contagions" (you’ll find the description for this project on the Minerva Initiative’s funding page).

The Department of Defense’s investment in the mechanics of psychological contagion and Facebook’s assistance, have some very serious implications, particularly when placed in context with other scandals which have broken in the past two years.

First of all we know that Facebook willingly participated (and presumably is still participating) in the NSA’s PRISM program by giving the agency unfettered access to user communications. We also know that the U.S. government has invested heavily in technology used to track and model the spread of opinions on social media.

The U.S. government hasn’t sought these capabilities for the sake of science. We know from the Cuban Twitter scandal, where the U.S. State Department where got caught red handed attempting to topple the Cuban government through social media, that these capabilities are already being used for offensive operations. Combine that with the fact that the U.S. Military got exposed in 2011 for developing ‘sock puppet’ software to create fake online identities and spread propaganda and an ominous picture snaps into focus.

The U.S. government is militarizing social media through a combination of technology and social sciences, and Facebook is helping them.

A bit conspiratorial, but it wouldn’t be a bit surprising to me if it is true.

07/02/1423 notes • Reblogged from notational


akukadogo:

petitcabinetdecuriosites:
The Tripitaka Koreana, Haeinsa Temple, South Korea The Tripitaka Koreana, Haeinsa Temple, South Korea, 1231. This is one of the oldest and most remarkable collections in the world. The items on the shelves are not books, but wooden printing blocks. There are over 80 000 of them. This building is not open to the public, although you can visit the temple and stare through the windows. It is one of the most remarkable places we were given access to. The blocks have been preserved by the clever design and layout of the buildings that house them, which ensure shelter and adequate ventilation. Set high in the mountains, cool winds have helped to keep the blocks in perfect condition for over 800 years.
high-res photo

akukadogo:

petitcabinetdecuriosites:

The Tripitaka Koreana, Haeinsa Temple, South Korea
The Tripitaka Koreana, Haeinsa Temple, South Korea, 1231. This is one of the oldest and most remarkable collections in the world. The items on the shelves are not books, but wooden printing blocks. There are over 80 000 of them. This building is not open to the public, although you can visit the temple and stare through the windows. It is one of the most remarkable places we were given access to. The blocks have been preserved by the clever design and layout of the buildings that house them, which ensure shelter and adequate ventilation. Set high in the mountains, cool winds have helped to keep the blocks in perfect condition for over 800 years.

07/02/1463 notes • Reblogged from catherinewillis