me
Heavens, 'tis dusk already!

Betty Ann on Flipboard

Noteworthy and Not



tsparks:

melissaannandthecool:

Just a reminder

Please Broadcast This
high-res photo

tsparks:

melissaannandthecool:

Just a reminder

Please Broadcast This

09/17/1458,817 notes • Reblogged from notational


thisismymindokay:

farhanshk:

hassann:

This is some next level shit

I’m gonna make my sister sit on the upper deck on her mehndhi while I’ll drive it, with my other sister in the back.

This is amazing
high-res photo

thisismymindokay:

farhanshk:

hassann:

This is some next level shit

I’m gonna make my sister sit on the upper deck on her mehndhi while I’ll drive it, with my other sister in the back.

This is amazing

(Source: ideasofjugaad)

09/11/142,390 notes • Reblogged from fuckyeahsouthasia




Tolerance can never embrace. It suffers differences, instead of being hospitable to them. Though more gentle or discreet, tolerance is merely a different form of intolerance. “Toleration,” Goethe observed, “ought in reality to be merely a transitory mood. It must lead to recognition. To tolerate is to insult.” Hospitality, in contrast, embraces the radical pluralism of reality: the incommensurable otherness of the other. Hospitality means opening your arms and the doors of your heart to those who are radically different.
Gustavo Esteva, as quoted by Matt Hern in Common Ground in a Liquid City and “In Defense of an Urban Future” (transcription via salted lion)
09/08/1414 notes • Reblogged from robertogreco


robertogreco:

Smart Birds Open Doors, Grant Hughes

Lisa Wade writes:

[…] This is a story, obviously, of how smart birds are, but here’s what struck me: we often think about human technology as for humans. In this case, however, birds adapted the technology for their own very similar needs (to get in and out).

If the workers had installed an older human technology — plain old doors — the birds would have been out of luck because they don’t have thumbs and the strength to manipulate an environment built for humans. But motion activated doors make both thumbs and strength irrelevant, so now birds are our functional equals.

This is fascinating, yeah? Our technology has advanced to the point where we’re potentially undermining our own evolutionary advantages.

(via Anne)

09/08/144 notes • Reblogged from robertogreco


Nature is busy creating absolutely unique individuals, whereas culture has invented a single mold to which all must conform. It is grotesque.
U.G. Krishnamurti (via myelvenkingdom)
09/07/1411,242 notes • Reblogged from wildcat2030


The plague of mankind is the fear and rejection of diversity… The belief that there is only one right way to live…

Thomas Stephen Szasz

(Psychiatrist)

(Source: cosmic-rebirth)

09/07/14216 notes • Reblogged from theantidote


Other people have a purpose; I alone don’t know. I drift like a wave on the ocean, I blow as aimless as the wind.

Lao Tzu

(via thecalminside)

09/07/14314 notes • Reblogged from theantidote


These findings highlight the important role of bacteria in the bidirectional communication of the gut-brain axis and suggest that certain organisms may prove to be useful therapeutic adjuncts in stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression.

Is our microbiome – the ecosystem of bacteria in our gut – running our lives

For more on the subject, see Rob Dunn’s fascinating book The Wild Life of Our Bodies: Predators, Parasites, and Partners That Shape Who We Are Today.

(via explore-blog)
09/07/14176 notes • Reblogged from explore-blog


wildcat2030:

Despite metamorphosis, moths hold on to memories from their days as a caterpillar

The striking transformation of a caterpillar into a colourful, winged butterfly is one that has captivated scientists for years. The metamorphosis involves the breakdown of most of the caterpillar’s tissues before reassembling to form a butterfly. It therefore seems unlikely that butterflies or moths would remember experiences from their caterpillar days. However, scientists have now established that not only can a moth retain memories formed while it was a caterpillar, but that experiences gained during these early stages can have drastic impacts on adult life.

Memories live long

Moths and butterflies undergo drastic changes throughout their life-cycle, not just in their outward appearance, but also in their diet and overall lifestyle. Metamorphosis occurs within the pupal case. During this period, the larval brain stimulates the release of enzymes which dissolve most of its tissues into their constituent proteins through a process called histolysis. Then a group of specialised cells called histoblasts proceed to reconstruct the broken-down caterpillar body into that of a butterfly or a moth.

A few years ago, Martha Weiss and her group at Georgetown University discovered that aversive memories formed in the tobacco hornworm caterpillar (Manduca sexta) persisted throughout metamorphosis and were retained in adult moths.

Weiss trained caterpillars to avoid the odour of ethyl acetate, a chemical commonly used in nail polish removers. Caterpillars and moths are usually indifferent to the smell of ethyl acetate, but by pairing exposure to the odour with mild electric shocks, the scientists successfully taught these caterpillars to avoid the odour.

When given a choice of air or ethyl acetate, 78% of the caterpillars carefully avoided the odour in favour of air. Then, when adult moths developed from the pupae of trained caterpillars a month later, they continued to show a strong aversion to the smell, with 77% of the moths choosing air over ethyl acetate. Notably, the majority of moths choosing air as adults had also made the same choice as caterpillars, suggesting that individual preferences survived metamorphosis.

09/07/14272 notes • Reblogged from wildcat2030


Give yourself a break. Just enjoy the day, your normal existence. Just sit. Just be.

Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche

(via christ-consciousness)

(Source: thecalminside)

09/07/142,617 notes • Reblogged from theantidote



The remains of artificial structures that pre-date the Amazon rainforest have been found beneath the trees in Bolivia and Brazil. The forest actually grew up and around their ruins, we read, gradually consuming these structures altogether as the rainforest we see there today slowly spread over hundreds of years and conquered the landscape.